Anchor roller

Satori hull #94.-- It appears that my anchor roller system is incomplete. The
way it’s set up now, I have just one set of rollers at the base of the bowsprit.-
This results in pulling up the anchor right into the hull and chipping the
gelcoat. (which I have already managed to accomplish). So now I have to
lean out over the bowsprit and lift the anchor out and away from the hull. This
is crazy-- can it be that this was the way it was designed? In a real blow I
would be dead meat trying to get up the anchor. From what I gather there
should be a second set of rollers out on the bowsprit–should I have one
custom fabricated? How far out on the bowsprit should I put it? For my future
cruising (and safety) I think this is a major decision. The experienced
cruisers I have talked to seem to place a lot of importance on their ground
tackle – and with my propensity to end up places I shouldn’t be, I’ve got the
feeling I"ll need the best-- what should I do?? Thanks for your help- pat

Hello Pat,

You may want to check out the bow rollers for the BCC which are mounted out
on the sprit.
Check out mikeandersonboatworks.com under the products section. They are
bronze and will help to solve your problem. Give Mike a call–he is very
knowledgable on the BCC and can help you out.
Best
Mark
----- Original Message -----
From: “prharrison2003” <harrison@gohighspeed.com >
To: <bcc@yahoogroups.com >
Sent: Wednesday, March 05, 2003 1:50 PM
Subject: [bcc] Anchor roller

Satori hull #94.-- It appears that my anchor roller system is incomplete.
The
way it’s set up now, I have just one set of rollers at the base of the
bowsprit.-
This results in pulling up the anchor right into the hull and chipping the
gelcoat. (which I have already managed to accomplish). So now I have to
lean out over the bowsprit and lift the anchor out and away from the hull.
This
is crazy-- can it be that this was the way it was designed? In a real
blow I
would be dead meat trying to get up the anchor. From what I gather there
should be a second set of rollers out on the bowsprit–should I have one
custom fabricated? How far out on the bowsprit should I put it? For my
future
cruising (and safety) I think this is a major decision. The experienced
cruisers I have talked to seem to place a lot of importance on their
ground
tackle – and with my propensity to end up places I shouldn’t be, I’ve got
the
feeling I"ll need the best-- what should I do?? Thanks for your help- pat

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I just ordered a set of double rollers that go out further on the sprit. I
ordered them from Sumio at Sam L. Morse. It is all stainless steel with
delrin rollers.
It runs about $800 plus shipping, it is only electro-polished not buffed
like the old ones. The buffing has gone up significantly in the past year.

Steve Osborne
Crystal Swan II

----- Original Message -----
From: “prharrison2003” <harrison@gohighspeed.com >
To: <bcc@yahoogroups.com >
Sent: Wednesday, March 05, 2003 12:50 PM
Subject: [bcc] Anchor roller

Satori hull #94.-- It appears that my anchor roller system is incomplete.
The
way it’s set up now, I have just one set of rollers at the base of the
bowsprit.-
This results in pulling up the anchor right into the hull and chipping the
gelcoat. (which I have already managed to accomplish). So now I have to
lean out over the bowsprit and lift the anchor out and away from the hull.
This
is crazy-- can it be that this was the way it was designed? In a real
blow I
would be dead meat trying to get up the anchor. From what I gather there
should be a second set of rollers out on the bowsprit–should I have one
custom fabricated? How far out on the bowsprit should I put it? For my
future
cruising (and safety) I think this is a major decision. The experienced
cruisers I have talked to seem to place a lot of importance on their
ground
tackle – and with my propensity to end up places I shouldn’t be, I’ve got
the
feeling I"ll need the best-- what should I do?? Thanks for your help- pat

BRISTOL CHANNEL CUTTER OWNERS ASSOCIATION
Mail List Home: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bcc
BCC Owners Home: http://www.geocities.com/bccowners
Post message: mailto:bcc@yahoogroups.com
Subscribe: mailto:bcc-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
Unsubscribe: mailto:bcc-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
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— Steven Osborne
<steven.j.osborne@worldnet.att.net > wrote: > I just
ordered a set of double rollers that go out

further on the sprit. I
ordered them from Sumio at Sam L. Morse. It is all
stainless steel with
delrin rollers.

A timely discussion, because just two months ago I
found I had to modify the forward anchor rollers on
Zygote, BCC #116.

Sam L Morse Co has been offering forward anchor
rollers as an option on recent hulls.

The forward anchor rollers seem to have been of at
least two types, depending on how they were attached
to the bowsprit.

The earlier type was attached to the bowsprit, just
aft of the gammon iron, only by four wood screws,
inserted from above. A later type had, in addition,
screws inserted from each side.

I had the earlier type, but I think that most hulls
more recent than Zygote have the later type. And Steve
may have just bought one of the later types for
Crystal Swan II.

On Zygote, I discovered at the past annual haul-out
that forces exerted by the anchor chain had started to
lift the aft two screws out of the bowsprit. I use the
forward anchor roller for all raising and lowering,
but I do not store my anchor, even temporarily, on it.
I had chosed the option of the forward anchor roller
when I commissioned the building of BCC #116, after
having the bow of a previous boat scarred by the
anchor chain, including from anchoring in
wind-against-tide conditions with the hull pushed
forwad against the chain.

I discussed the use of forward rollers with other
owners and found:

  1. one other owner, with the earlier type, who uses
    his forward anchor roller for all anchoring tasks, and
    who usually stores his primary anchor (a CQR)
    temporarily with the shank just sitting in the forward
    anchor roller. But he had once had a guest who, when
    asked to bring up the anchor using the electric
    windlass, had allowed the windlass to continue hauling
    even after the shank met the roller, tearing out the
    top screws. The remedy was to add screws from the side
    of the fitting and an extension plate;

  2. another owner, with the later type fitting, who
    used the forward anchor roller for storage of the
    anchor and for sitting at anchor, and would always
    shift the chain to the bow roller to raise and lower;
    and

  3. owners with the later type fitting, who reported
    no problems regardless of how they used their forward
    roller.

I acted before I had gathered all this info. I
commissioned a stainless steel worker to add extension
plates to the sides of my forward anchor roller
fitting, allowing an additional eight screws on each
side. The major extension was aft of the fitting - in
hindsight, I think I could have extended it forward
too, which would have allowed me to use the fitting as
a temporary anchor storage while confident that anchor
movement would not scar the bowsprit timber.

I’ve attached a photo (116aroller.jpg, about 69 K) to
this e-mail. The boat is pointing to the right of the
image. The photo was taken at a marina in mid-voyage,
so the photo shows jacklines (blue tape) and snubbing
line (nylon line running out to a block on the cranse
iron and back); you’ll also see a strand of
black/orange line woven into the anchor chain to mark
how far to haul the rode in (I store my primary CQR on
deck, following a method I first saw on Roger Olson’s
Nereus).

Cheers

Bil

Penang, Malaysia

http://mobile.yahoo.com.au - Yahoo! Mobile

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So the screws are enough for the forces encountered?

My first inclination would have been to through bolt.

But I always was a belt and suspenders man.

Don / Daytona

----- Original Message -----
From: “Bil Hansen” <bilh2001@yahoo.com.au >
To: <bcc@yahoogroups.com >
Sent: Wednesday, March 05, 2003 10:58 PM
Subject: Re: [bcc] Anchor roller

— Steven Osborne
<steven.j.osborne@worldnet.att.net > wrote: > I just
ordered a set of double rollers that go out

further on the sprit. I
ordered them from Sumio at Sam L. Morse. It is all
stainless steel with
delrin rollers.

A timely discussion, because just two months ago I
found I had to modify the forward anchor rollers on
Zygote, BCC #116.

Sam L Morse Co has been offering forward anchor
rollers as an option on recent hulls.

The forward anchor rollers seem to have been of at
least two types, depending on how they were attached
to the bowsprit.

The earlier type was attached to the bowsprit, just
aft of the gammon iron, only by four wood screws,
inserted from above. A later type had, in addition,
screws inserted from each side.

I had the earlier type, but I think that most hulls
more recent than Zygote have the later type. And Steve
may have just bought one of the later types for
Crystal Swan II.

On Zygote, I discovered at the past annual haul-out
that forces exerted by the anchor chain had started to
lift the aft two screws out of the bowsprit. I use the
forward anchor roller for all raising and lowering,
but I do not store my anchor, even temporarily, on it.
I had chosed the option of the forward anchor roller
when I commissioned the building of BCC #116, after
having the bow of a previous boat scarred by the
anchor chain, including from anchoring in
wind-against-tide conditions with the hull pushed
forwad against the chain.

I discussed the use of forward rollers with other
owners and found:

  1. one other owner, with the earlier type, who uses
    his forward anchor roller for all anchoring tasks, and
    who usually stores his primary anchor (a CQR)
    temporarily with the shank just sitting in the forward
    anchor roller. But he had once had a guest who, when
    asked to bring up the anchor using the electric
    windlass, had allowed the windlass to continue hauling
    even after the shank met the roller, tearing out the
    top screws. The remedy was to add screws from the side
    of the fitting and an extension plate;

  2. another owner, with the later type fitting, who
    used the forward anchor roller for storage of the
    anchor and for sitting at anchor, and would always
    shift the chain to the bow roller to raise and lower;
    and

  3. owners with the later type fitting, who reported
    no problems regardless of how they used their forward
    roller.

I acted before I had gathered all this info. I
commissioned a stainless steel worker to add extension
plates to the sides of my forward anchor roller
fitting, allowing an additional eight screws on each
side. The major extension was aft of the fitting - in
hindsight, I think I could have extended it forward
too, which would have allowed me to use the fitting as
a temporary anchor storage while confident that anchor
movement would not scar the bowsprit timber.

I’ve attached a photo (116aroller.jpg, about 69 K) to
this e-mail. The boat is pointing to the right of the
image. The photo was taken at a marina in mid-voyage,
so the photo shows jacklines (blue tape) and snubbing
line (nylon line running out to a block on the cranse
iron and back); you’ll also see a strand of
black/orange line woven into the anchor chain to mark
how far to haul the rode in (I store my primary CQR on
deck, following a method I first saw on Roger Olson’s
Nereus).

Cheers

Bil

Penang, Malaysia

http://mobile.yahoo.com.au - Yahoo! Mobile

Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



Here is what I have. It is a custom fabricated CQR holder with a built
in roller. The roller is not strong enough for actual anchoring, but
once the hook is broken out, I put the chain in the roller to keep it
off the topsides. For actual anchoring, I use a snubber attached to a
block at the end of the sprit. I have the diagrams for its fabrication
if anyone is interested. No idea of cost.
John Churchill