nNew BCC

I know that many of you have a great deal of experience with BCC’s. I
hope to order a new one within the next few weeks and would greatly
appreciate any suggestions for modifications based upon your use.
While Sumio has been very nice and quite helpful I still would like
to hear of problems and solutions from owners.

The intended use for the boat is singlehanding. .

I do not own a BCC but I have been on 15 or so BCC’s and sailed a few. I
have visited many other boat builders shops; wooden, steel and FPG in the US
and Europe. I have sailed many of the normal ‘boat show’ boats. My Dad has a
45’ Hunter. I can say without reservation that dollar for dollar, foot for
foot, seaworthiness and workmanship that the BCC is an outstanding value. It
is all they say it is and more. You must significantly increase the price to
find a more solid, well designed out boat. And it would be larger. The
company and its folks are as solid as their boats. That is my 2 cents worth.
Sorry, no coffee with this one.
Regards, Skip Fritz

----- Original Message -----
From: <jhiller@ameritech.net >
To: <bcc@yahoogroups.com >
Sent: Thursday, April 05, 2001 6:24 AM
Subject: [bcc] nNew BCC

I know that many of you have a great deal of experience with BCC’s. I
hope to order a new one within the next few weeks and would greatly
appreciate any suggestions for modifications based upon your use.
While Sumio has been very nice and quite helpful I still would like
to hear of problems and solutions from owners.

The intended use for the boat is singlehanding. .

BRISTOL CHANNEL CUTTER OWNERS ASSOCIATION
Home page: http://members.aol.com/calypsonia/bcc/bcc.htm
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I have BCC hull #22 and have been living aboard and
sailing her for the past 22 years…with my wife,
who is probably the best seaman, pound for pound, that
I know of.
While having a second person on board is not exactly
single handing, it is very close to it so far as
handling the boat in normal conditions, which if
you’re doing things right, is most of the time. And
for that reason, setting the boat up for “easy of
sailing” is about the same as setting it up for single
handing. Under normal conditions there shouldn’t be
any reason to wake up a mate to make changes is the
sail configuations, whether it be adding more headsail
or reefing the main.

Being a hard head, It took more than 18 years before
I consented to roller furling on the jib, mostly
because I didn’t care for its look. Now I’m glad I
have it and if I could afford it, I’d have roller
furling on the staysail as well, as much as for a
handy place to stow the sail as for its convience.

So I would say, go with roller furling on the jib
and staysail. But not the main. I personally don’t
like leading the halyard and reefing lines to the
cockpit; they confused rather than simplify the
exercise of reefing.

Of course a windvane is essential. And opionions vary
on dodgers and bimini’s.

But as for the boat itself, I wouldn’t change
anything…maybe less brightwork if you really hate
to varnish but definitely go with the wooden wale
strake and standard bulwark.

As for the interior, we built our own and while the
layout somewhat follows Lyle Hess’s original, we have
adapted it to our own special design.

I wish you well and speaking from more than 40
years of boating experience and as a professional
captain and delivery skipper, you will find no boat
better suited to the individual smallboat sailer than
the Bristol Channel Cutter.

Stan Roeder “Waxwing”

jhiller@ameritech.net wrote:

I know that many of you have a great deal of
experience with BCC’s. I
hope to order a new one within the next few weeks
and would greatly
appreciate any suggestions for modifications based
upon your use.
While Sumio has been very nice and quite helpful I
still would like
to hear of problems and solutions from owners.

The intended use for the boat is singlehanding. .

====Stan Roeder & Barbara Wall


Do You Yahoo!?
Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail.
http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/

Mark Gearhart here. I have a few things I’d probably
do differently, if I were to have one built again.
Here are some major things that come to mind…

Get a Teak exterior instead of Mahagony. Costs
more but saves lots of time in maintanence.

Sampson Posts: Use a harder wood than Mahagony
or Teak. Mine are Mahagony and they have grooves
in them from wear. I’ve just taken them out and
turned them upside down. I’m now working on the
the “other” end.

Instead of one side locker on the port
cockpit, install two. One on the port and
a matching one on the starboard. Make the opening
big enough to drop in one or two folding bicycles.
Currently, there is no port locker. A berth is
in that spot, and I seem to be using it for
storage anyway.

Door latches. Not sure what SLM is using these
days, but my brass pull rings do not work well.

Extend the wood panel fronting the engine all the
way to the to the cabin sole. Do not stop X inches
above the sole. The hand crank for a Yanmar 3GM
needs more swinging room than the current panel
allows.

I think dorade vents are currently listed as an
option, right? I find these very useful for
circulation. I would get them again.

Do the Pardey style chain locker. Its open all
the way to the bow. Much better circulation and
lots more space. That locker seems to be building
up a lot of humidity and mold.

At the wood/fiberglass seam along the deck, put
in a strip of sulfide to allow for expansion.
I have rot at the seam because the varnish cracks
there from the expansion and contraction.

My wood rail, just in front of the forward
chain plate, is banged up from running into
docks (oh well). Maybe SLM can put a stainless
steel plate there to keep from damaging the
wood. That’s what I plan to do.

More stainless steel plates along the bowsprit.
I’ve added a big one where the anchor shank
rests, and another big on on the deck.

I removed the engine once and boy was the boat
light!! 300+ lbs. Same as two extra people
sitting in the cockpit. Wonder if a BCC really
needs all that engine. If I had to do it again, I
would investigate a smaller engine. I’ve never
really needed to crank it up to advertised
rpm, other than to make time before dark.

Hope this helps.

Mark Gearhart
S/V Godspeed

— In bcc@y…, jhiller@a… wrote:

I know that many of you have a great deal of experience with BCC’s.
I
hope to order a new one within the next few weeks and would greatly
appreciate any suggestions for modifications based upon your use.
While Sumio has been very nice and quite helpful I still would like
to hear of problems and solutions from owners.

The intended use for the boat is singlehanding. .

I looked for 8 years at sailboats of all kinds and started saving for one at
just about the same time. Having 3 children I concentrated on 34+ footers,
but the BCC kept creeping back into my mind. It is one of the best built
boats I have ever seen in this price/size category. It is small enough to
sail and maintain even if you have to do a lot of the work yourself and with
the furler on the Jib, you really do not have to leave the cockpit much when
the weather turns a bit nasty. The only chages I have made were to install a
larger holding tank for the family and an additional bunk for my younger
daughter. I am assuming this bunk will be a temporary thing as my older 2 do
not really go for the slow and easy sailing (they do like the lasers and
smaller types for fun and speed) but the little one likes the “big boat”, as
she calls it, because it’s like a house on the water.

To starboard, my boat has a single berth that has a foot well that fits
under the heater. Above that is a shelf for books and a small locker. I made
a plywood bunk that fits over the lip of the shelf and attached small blocks
of wood to the paneling on the side of the Nav. table that is aft of the
berth and just in front of the locker. These hold the extended shelf/bunk
bed in place for sleeping. With a cut to size foam pad and sleeping bag, it
makes for a great sleeping perch. During the day we simply lift it and lower
it to fit over the lower bunk with the foam pad becomming the new place to
sit. This way we spent ten days on the boat to try it out as a family boat
and if it had not been for the 8.5 days of rain, I think it would have been
a great experience… So even on 28 ft of space you can have 5 people and
the dog if you are well organized. (Yes, don’t leave the dog at home. It
gives the kids something to do and fight over…) Even in the bad weather
the kids never once complained about the sailing, just the rain, but you get
what you get.

So if you are thinking of the BCC as maybe too small, think again! Do you
really want to bottom paint 45 ft of bottom? Or varnish a square mile of
brightwork? I figure once the kids leave home, it will look like a palace.
(Only they tell me they keep comming back. Maybe it will be just one at a
time. I can use the extra help.)

Cheers - Carlos

Stan Roeder wrote:

I have BCC hull #22 and have been living aboard and
sailing her for the past 22 years…with my wife,
who is probably the best seaman, pound for pound, that
I know of.
While having a second person on board is not exactly
single handing, it is very close to it so far as
handling the boat in normal conditions, which if
you’re doing things right, is most of the time. And
for that reason, setting the boat up for “easy of
sailing” is about the same as setting it up for single
handing. Under normal conditions there shouldn’t be
any reason to wake up a mate to make changes is the
sail configuations, whether it be adding more headsail
or reefing the main.

Being a hard head, It took more than 18 years before
I consented to roller furling on the jib, mostly
because I didn’t care for its look. Now I’m glad I
have it and if I could afford it, I’d have roller
furling on the staysail as well, as much as for a
handy place to stow the sail as for its convience.

So I would say, go with roller furling on the jib
and staysail. But not the main. I personally don’t
like leading the halyard and reefing lines to the
cockpit; they confused rather than simplify the
exercise of reefing.

Of course a windvane is essential. And opionions vary
on dodgers and bimini’s.

But as for the boat itself, I wouldn’t change
anything…maybe less brightwork if you really hate
to varnish but definitely go with the wooden wale
strake and standard bulwark.

As for the interior, we built our own and while the
layout somewhat follows Lyle Hess’s original, we have
adapted it to our own special design.

I wish you well and speaking from more than 40
years of boating experience and as a professional
captain and delivery skipper, you will find no boat
better suited to the individual smallboat sailer than
the Bristol Channel Cutter.

Stan Roeder “Waxwing”

jhiller@ameritech.net wrote:

I know that many of you have a great deal of
experience with BCC’s. I
hope to order a new one within the next few weeks
and would greatly
appreciate any suggestions for modifications based
upon your use.
While Sumio has been very nice and quite helpful I
still would like
to hear of problems and solutions from owners.

The intended use for the boat is singlehanding. .

====> Stan Roeder & Barbara Wall


Do You Yahoo!?
Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail.
http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/

BRISTOL CHANNEL CUTTER OWNERS ASSOCIATION
Home page: http://members.aol.com/calypsonia/bcc/bcc.htm
Post message: bcc@yahoogroups.com
Subscribe: bcc-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
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Carlos and Stan-

Your two posts make me want to quit my job, move back to the US, buy a BCC and
go sailing for the rest of my life! I wish I had sold my stock six months ago.
This hurts!

-Bill Amsden

Carlos Colley wrote:

I looked for 8 years at sailboats of all kinds and started saving for one at
just about the same time. Having 3 children I concentrated on 34+ footers,
but the BCC kept creeping back into my mind. It is one of the best built
boats I have ever seen in this price/size category. It is small enough to
sail and maintain even if you have to do a lot of the work yourself and with
the furler on the Jib, you really do not have to leave the cockpit much when
the weather turns a bit nasty. The only chages I have made were to install a
larger holding tank for the family and an additional bunk for my younger
daughter. I am assuming this bunk will be a temporary thing as my older 2 do
not really go for the slow and easy sailing (they do like the lasers and
smaller types for fun and speed) but the little one likes the “big boat”, as
she calls it, because it’s like a house on the water.

To starboard, my boat has a single berth that has a foot well that fits
under the heater. Above that is a shelf for books and a small locker. I made
a plywood bunk that fits over the lip of the shelf and attached small blocks
of wood to the paneling on the side of the Nav. table that is aft of the
berth and just in front of the locker. These hold the extended shelf/bunk
bed in place for sleeping. With a cut to size foam pad and sleeping bag, it
makes for a great sleeping perch. During the day we simply lift it and lower
it to fit over the lower bunk with the foam pad becomming the new place to
sit. This way we spent ten days on the boat to try it out as a family boat
and if it had not been for the 8.5 days of rain, I think it would have been
a great experience… So even on 28 ft of space you can have 5 people and
the dog if you are well organized. (Yes, don’t leave the dog at home. It
gives the kids something to do and fight over…) Even in the bad weather
the kids never once complained about the sailing, just the rain, but you get
what you get.

So if you are thinking of the BCC as maybe too small, think again! Do you
really want to bottom paint 45 ft of bottom? Or varnish a square mile of
brightwork? I figure once the kids leave home, it will look like a palace.
(Only they tell me they keep comming back. Maybe it will be just one at a
time. I can use the extra help.)

Cheers - Carlos

Stan Roeder wrote:

I have BCC hull #22 and have been living aboard and
sailing her for the past 22 years…with my wife,
who is probably the best seaman, pound for pound, that
I know of.
While having a second person on board is not exactly
single handing, it is very close to it so far as
handling the boat in normal conditions, which if
you’re doing things right, is most of the time. And
for that reason, setting the boat up for “easy of
sailing” is about the same as setting it up for single
handing. Under normal conditions there shouldn’t be
any reason to wake up a mate to make changes is the
sail configuations, whether it be adding more headsail
or reefing the main.

Being a hard head, It took more than 18 years before
I consented to roller furling on the jib, mostly
because I didn’t care for its look. Now I’m glad I
have it and if I could afford it, I’d have roller
furling on the staysail as well, as much as for a
handy place to stow the sail as for its convience.

So I would say, go with roller furling on the jib
and staysail. But not the main. I personally don’t
like leading the halyard and reefing lines to the
cockpit; they confused rather than simplify the
exercise of reefing.

Of course a windvane is essential. And opionions vary
on dodgers and bimini’s.

But as for the boat itself, I wouldn’t change
anything…maybe less brightwork if you really hate
to varnish but definitely go with the wooden wale
strake and standard bulwark.

As for the interior, we built our own and while the
layout somewhat follows Lyle Hess’s original, we have
adapted it to our own special design.

I wish you well and speaking from more than 40
years of boating experience and as a professional
captain and delivery skipper, you will find no boat
better suited to the individual smallboat sailer than
the Bristol Channel Cutter.

Stan Roeder “Waxwing”

jhiller@ameritech.net wrote:

I know that many of you have a great deal of
experience with BCC’s. I
hope to order a new one within the next few weeks
and would greatly
appreciate any suggestions for modifications based
upon your use.
While Sumio has been very nice and quite helpful I
still would like
to hear of problems and solutions from owners.

The intended use for the boat is singlehanding. .

====> > Stan Roeder & Barbara Wall


Do You Yahoo!?
Get email at your own domain with Yahoo! Mail.
http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/

BRISTOL CHANNEL CUTTER OWNERS ASSOCIATION
Home page: http://members.aol.com/calypsonia/bcc/bcc.htm
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What would you use for the sampson posts? I am very appreciative of that
well thought out response.
Regards,
Jim hiller

Mark Gearhart wrote:

Mark Gearhart here. I have a few things I’d probably
do differently, if I were to have one built again.
Here are some major things that come to mind…

Get a Teak exterior instead of Mahagony. Costs
more but saves lots of time in maintanence.

Sampson Posts: Use a harder wood than Mahagony
or Teak. Mine are Mahagony and they have grooves
in them from wear. I’ve just taken them out and
turned them upside down. I’m now working on the
the “other” end.

Instead of one side locker on the port
cockpit, install two. One on the port and
a matching one on the starboard. Make the opening
big enough to drop in one or two folding bicycles.
Currently, there is no port locker. A berth is
in that spot, and I seem to be using it for
storage anyway.

Door latches. Not sure what SLM is using these
days, but my brass pull rings do not work well.

Extend the wood panel fronting the engine all the
way to the to the cabin sole. Do not stop X inches
above the sole. The hand crank for a Yanmar 3GM
needs more swinging room than the current panel
allows.

I think dorade vents are currently listed as an
option, right? I find these very useful for
circulation. I would get them again.

Do the Pardey style chain locker. Its open all
the way to the bow. Much better circulation and
lots more space. That locker seems to be building
up a lot of humidity and mold.

At the wood/fiberglass seam along the deck, put
in a strip of sulfide to allow for expansion.
I have rot at the seam because the varnish cracks
there from the expansion and contraction.

My wood rail, just in front of the forward
chain plate, is banged up from running into
docks (oh well). Maybe SLM can put a stainless
steel plate there to keep from damaging the
wood. That’s what I plan to do.

More stainless steel plates along the bowsprit.
I’ve added a big one where the anchor shank
rests, and another big on on the deck.

I removed the engine once and boy was the boat
light!! 300+ lbs. Same as two extra people
sitting in the cockpit. Wonder if a BCC really
needs all that engine. If I had to do it again, I
would investigate a smaller engine. I’ve never
really needed to crank it up to advertised
rpm, other than to make time before dark.

Hope this helps.

Mark Gearhart
S/V Godspeed

— In bcc@y…, jhiller@a… wrote:

I know that many of you have a great deal of experience with BCC’s.
I
hope to order a new one within the next few weeks and would greatly
appreciate any suggestions for modifications based upon your use.
While Sumio has been very nice and quite helpful I still would like
to hear of problems and solutions from owners.

The intended use for the boat is singlehanding. .

BRISTOL CHANNEL CUTTER OWNERS ASSOCIATION
Home page: http://members.aol.com/calypsonia/bcc/bcc.htm
Post message: bcc@yahoogroups.com
Subscribe: bcc-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
Unsubscribe: bcc-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
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I’m not sure, a wood expert could probably recommend
something very hard and durable. I think Dick would
know for sure. He and Tom are the shipwrights who build
the BCC.

Mark Gearhart

— In bcc@y…, james hiller <jhiller@a…> wrote:

What would you use for the sampson posts? I am very appreciative of
that
well thought out response.
Regards,
Jim hiller

Mark Gearhart wrote:

Mark Gearhart here. I have a few things I’d probably
do differently, if I were to have one built again.
Here are some major things that come to mind…

Get a Teak exterior instead of Mahagony. Costs
more but saves lots of time in maintanence.

Sampson Posts: Use a harder wood than Mahagony
or Teak. Mine are Mahagony and they have grooves
in them from wear. I’ve just taken them out and
turned them upside down. I’m now working on the
the “other” end.

Instead of one side locker on the port
cockpit, install two. One on the port and
a matching one on the starboard. Make the opening
big enough to drop in one or two folding bicycles.
Currently, there is no port locker. A berth is
in that spot, and I seem to be using it for
storage anyway.

Door latches. Not sure what SLM is using these
days, but my brass pull rings do not work well.

Extend the wood panel fronting the engine all the
way to the to the cabin sole. Do not stop X inches
above the sole. The hand crank for a Yanmar 3GM
needs more swinging room than the current panel
allows.

I think dorade vents are currently listed as an
option, right? I find these very useful for
circulation. I would get them again.

Do the Pardey style chain locker. Its open all
the way to the bow. Much better circulation and
lots more space. That locker seems to be building
up a lot of humidity and mold.

At the wood/fiberglass seam along the deck, put
in a strip of sulfide to allow for expansion.
I have rot at the seam because the varnish cracks
there from the expansion and contraction.

My wood rail, just in front of the forward
chain plate, is banged up from running into
docks (oh well). Maybe SLM can put a stainless
steel plate there to keep from damaging the
wood. That’s what I plan to do.

More stainless steel plates along the bowsprit.
I’ve added a big one where the anchor shank
rests, and another big on on the deck.

I removed the engine once and boy was the boat
light!! 300+ lbs. Same as two extra people
sitting in the cockpit. Wonder if a BCC really
needs all that engine. If I had to do it again, I
would investigate a smaller engine. I’ve never
really needed to crank it up to advertised
rpm, other than to make time before dark.

Hope this helps.

Mark Gearhart
S/V Godspeed

— In bcc@y…, jhiller@a… wrote:

I know that many of you have a great deal of experience with
BCC’s.
I
hope to order a new one within the next few weeks and would
greatly
appreciate any suggestions for modifications based upon your
use.
While Sumio has been very nice and quite helpful I still would
like
to hear of problems and solutions from owners.

The intended use for the boat is singlehanding. .

BRISTOL CHANNEL CUTTER OWNERS ASSOCIATION
Home page: http://members.aol.com/calypsonia/bcc/bcc.htm
Post message: bcc@y…
Subscribe: bcc-subscribe@y…
Unsubscribe: bcc-unsubscribe@y…
List owner: bcc-owner@y…
Archives: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bcc

Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

Jim, When I built Waxwing I used a combination of oak
and mahagony for the bitts. That is a slab of mahogany
sandwiched between two pieces of oak for each bitt. I
though the harder wood would be sufficent to take the
abuse of the anchor line, etcetera, but the use of
lines on the bits still tended to round over the edges
over the years. My final solution was to ‘let in’ some
pieces of half-oval bronze at the corners of the bitts
to stop the cutting in effect of the lines
(dock/anchor). This has worked well and looks good
too. For my purposes I used eight inch pieces of 1/2
inch bronze, starting the in-lay about an inch below
the top and extending down. The could be shorter
though since they are only affective on that area of
the bitts that extend above the sprit.

good sailing to ya,
Stan R.

— james hiller <jhiller@ameritech.net > wrote:

What would you use for the sampson posts? I am very
appreciative of that
well thought out response.
Regards,
Jim hiller

Mark Gearhart wrote:

Mark Gearhart here. I have a few things I’d
probably
do differently, if I were to have one built again.
Here are some major things that come to mind…

Get a Teak exterior instead of Mahagony. Costs
more but saves lots of time in maintanence.

Sampson Posts: Use a harder wood than Mahagony
or Teak. Mine are Mahagony and they have grooves
in them from wear. I’ve just taken them out and
turned them upside down. I’m now working on the
the “other” end.

Instead of one side locker on the port
cockpit, install two. One on the port and
a matching one on the starboard. Make the opening
big enough to drop in one or two folding bicycles.
Currently, there is no port locker. A berth is
in that spot, and I seem to be using it for
storage anyway.

Door latches. Not sure what SLM is using these
days, but my brass pull rings do not work well.

Extend the wood panel fronting the engine all the
way to the to the cabin sole. Do not stop X inches
above the sole. The hand crank for a Yanmar 3GM
needs more swinging room than the current panel
allows.

I think dorade vents are currently listed as an
option, right? I find these very useful for
circulation. I would get them again.

Do the Pardey style chain locker. Its open all
the way to the bow. Much better circulation and
lots more space. That locker seems to be building
up a lot of humidity and mold.

At the wood/fiberglass seam along the deck, put
in a strip of sulfide to allow for expansion.
I have rot at the seam because the varnish cracks
there from the expansion and contraction.

My wood rail, just in front of the forward
chain plate, is banged up from running into
docks (oh well). Maybe SLM can put a stainless
steel plate there to keep from damaging the
wood. That’s what I plan to do.

More stainless steel plates along the bowsprit.
I’ve added a big one where the anchor shank
rests, and another big on on the deck.

I removed the engine once and boy was the boat
light!! 300+ lbs. Same as two extra people
sitting in the cockpit. Wonder if a BCC really
needs all that engine. If I had to do it again, I
would investigate a smaller engine. I’ve never
really needed to crank it up to advertised
rpm, other than to make time before dark.

Hope this helps.

Mark Gearhart
S/V Godspeed

— In bcc@y…, jhiller@a… wrote:

I know that many of you have a great deal of
experience with BCC’s.
I
hope to order a new one within the next few
weeks and would greatly
appreciate any suggestions for modifications
based upon your use.
While Sumio has been very nice and quite helpful
I still would like
to hear of problems and solutions from owners.

The intended use for the boat is singlehanding.
.

BRISTOL CHANNEL CUTTER OWNERS ASSOCIATION
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On my BCC (hull #64), I’m quite sure the bitts are of oak. It is a very
hard wood, which I found out when I had to hand-cut the lower 6" or so to
instal a 16-gallon holding tank. The bitts above the bowsprit are shaped
sort of like the middle section of an hourglass, with all corners well
rounded. Although my BCC is now 18 years old, the bitts do not show any
sign of wear from dock lines nor anchor rodes.

-----Original Message-----
From: james hiller [mailto:jhiller@ameritech.net ]
Sent: Friday, April 06, 2001 8:50 AM
To: bcc@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [bcc] Re: nNew BCC

What would you use for the sampson posts? I am very appreciative of that
well thought out response.
Regards,
Jim hiller

Mark Gearhart wrote:

Mark Gearhart here. I have a few things I’d probably
do differently, if I were to have one built again.
Here are some major things that come to mind…

Get a Teak exterior instead of Mahagony. Costs
more but saves lots of time in maintanence.

Sampson Posts: Use a harder wood than Mahagony
or Teak. Mine are Mahagony and they have grooves
in them from wear. I’ve just taken them out and
turned them upside down. I’m now working on the
the “other” end.

Instead of one side locker on the port
cockpit, install two. One on the port and
a matching one on the starboard. Make the opening
big enough to drop in one or two folding bicycles.
Currently, there is no port locker. A berth is
in that spot, and I seem to be using it for
storage anyway.

Door latches. Not sure what SLM is using these
days, but my brass pull rings do not work well.

Extend the wood panel fronting the engine all the
way to the to the cabin sole. Do not stop X inches
above the sole. The hand crank for a Yanmar 3GM
needs more swinging room than the current panel
allows.

I think dorade vents are currently listed as an
option, right? I find these very useful for
circulation. I would get them again.

Do the Pardey style chain locker. Its open all
the way to the bow. Much better circulation and
lots more space. That locker seems to be building
up a lot of humidity and mold.

At the wood/fiberglass seam along the deck, put
in a strip of sulfide to allow for expansion.
I have rot at the seam because the varnish cracks
there from the expansion and contraction.

My wood rail, just in front of the forward
chain plate, is banged up from running into
docks (oh well). Maybe SLM can put a stainless
steel plate there to keep from damaging the
wood. That’s what I plan to do.

More stainless steel plates along the bowsprit.
I’ve added a big one where the anchor shank
rests, and another big on on the deck.

I removed the engine once and boy was the boat
light!! 300+ lbs. Same as two extra people
sitting in the cockpit. Wonder if a BCC really
needs all that engine. If I had to do it again, I
would investigate a smaller engine. I’ve never
really needed to crank it up to advertised
rpm, other than to make time before dark.

Hope this helps.

Mark Gearhart
S/V Godspeed

— In bcc@y…, jhiller@a… wrote:

I know that many of you have a great deal of experience with BCC’s.
I
hope to order a new one within the next few weeks and would greatly
appreciate any suggestions for modifications based upon your use.
While Sumio has been very nice and quite helpful I still would like
to hear of problems and solutions from owners.

The intended use for the boat is singlehanding. .

BRISTOL CHANNEL CUTTER OWNERS ASSOCIATION
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if i were building new, i would be sure to do the things that cannot
be changed later. i would consider putting some kevlar in the
laminate for penetration resistance (don’t know if this is effective).
insulate the interior with 1/2" closed cell foam from overhead down
to cabin sole. i would have teak exterior woodwork which doesn’t
tend to darken as bad if the varnish lifts. make the overhead panels
removable. barrier coat the hull. i wouls have done the interior in
something other than teak-white enamel and mahogany or cherry, but
that is a personal choice. on marc roman’s vancouver built bcc,
there are 4 opening ports per side-not at all unattractive. i would
not put in less than the 3gm30f, weight saving is not much with a
smaller engine, fuel consumption is related to power used rather than
potential. i might also consider ditching the quarter berth for a
second cockpit locker although it is a good sea berth.
john churchill

Thanks John;
I actually have Ray Richards the Naval Architect working a new laminate
which will give the BCC hull an increase in puncture and impact resistance.
Possibly the factory may decide to offer that as an option for severe
service duty or far Northern use in the same way that Oyster the British
boatbuilder does.
Regards,
Jim Hiller
----- Original Message -----
From: <jchurchill@erols.com >
To: <bcc@yahoogroups.com >
Sent: Monday, April 09, 2001 12:36 PM
Subject: [bcc] Re: nNew BCC

if i were building new, i would be sure to do the things that cannot
be changed later. i would consider putting some kevlar in the
laminate for penetration resistance (don’t know if this is effective).
insulate the interior with 1/2" closed cell foam from overhead down
to cabin sole. i would have teak exterior woodwork which doesn’t
tend to darken as bad if the varnish lifts. make the overhead panels
removable. barrier coat the hull. i wouls have done the interior in
something other than teak-white enamel and mahogany or cherry, but
that is a personal choice. on marc roman’s vancouver built bcc,
there are 4 opening ports per side-not at all unattractive. i would
not put in less than the 3gm30f, weight saving is not much with a
smaller engine, fuel consumption is related to power used rather than
potential. i might also consider ditching the quarter berth for a
second cockpit locker although it is a good sea berth.
john churchill

BRISTOL CHANNEL CUTTER OWNERS ASSOCIATION
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mark- you mention a hand crank for your yanmar. do you have the
3gm30f? i am considering alternatives to a spare starter ($460). an
expert sais it was not possible to hand start this engine due to
displacement and compression ratio. any info yopu know? do you have
a dimension for the hand crank?
thanks
john churchill

— In bcc@y…, jhiller@a… wrote:

I know that many of you have a great deal of experience with BCC’s.
I
hope to order a new one within the next few weeks and would greatly
appreciate any suggestions for modifications based upon your use.
While Sumio has been very nice and quite helpful I still would like
to hear of problems and solutions from owners.

The intended use for the boat is singlehanding. .
There are two concerns with the portholes that I would address. The
ABI portholes use brass screws from the back side to secure the
attachments to the front side. If the portholes eventually leak
[likely] then the brass will corrode and the attachments to the front
will fail. These should be replaced with stainless steel as bronze in
that size are hard to find. Secondly, I would have Smith’s
Penetrating Epoxy applied to the plywood around the portholes so any
leaks[likely] will not rot the plywood and cause an extensive repair.
I would also get assurance from Sam Morse Co. that the portholes will
be extensively and thoroughly caulked. I hope this helps.