Re: fuel tanks

 My Sabb came with a 10 gallon monel(?)fuel tank that incorporates a sediment bowl and drain on the bottom. I drain a bit into a glass jar every so often and it will show any water droplets and heavy debris.

The fuel outlet hose also comes off the bottom and I think it is this feature in particular that the U.S. regs are against since a fire that burns through the fuel line at any point would drain the tank. When the fuel line comes off the top of the tank, it will only syphon into a fire if the break occurs at a point lower then tank itself.

However I don't see why a bowl and drain petcock on the bottom of a U.S. tank would harm anything since it is all metal.

At the same time, as has already been pointed out, many fuel tanks are located where a bottom drain isn't possible anyway, such as in the bilge, keel envelope or wedged under a settee or bunk.I have my tank, (horizontal cylinder) mounted against the hull in the port quarter, under the cockit.

For my money, the regs be damned. I like my set up and because of it I've never clogged a filter or run water through my injector...a very expensive occurance.

Stan , hull #22, Waxwing



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The USCG regs about tanks, etc only apply to inspected (eg passenger
for hire) vessels. They also forbid a number of other things common
on our strictly pleasure boats such as plastic bowls on the fuel
filters. We can do almost anything we want as those rules do not
apply to us. I think a drain bowl is a fine idea but not always
readily implementable.

John

— In bcc@yahoogroups.com , Stan Roeder <waxwingers@y…> wrote:

My Sabb came with a 10 gallon monel(?)fuel tank that incorporates
a sediment bowl and drain on the bottom. I drain a bit into a glass
jar every so often and it will show any water droplets and heavy
debris.

The fuel outlet hose also comes off the bottom and I think it is
this feature in particular that the U.S. regs are against since a
fire that burns through the fuel line at any point would drain the
tank. When the fuel line comes off the top of the tank, it will only
syphon into a fire if the break occurs at a point lower then tank
itself.

However I don’t see why a bowl and drain petcock on the bottom of a
U.S. tank would harm anything since it is all metal.

At the same time, as has already been pointed out, many fuel tanks
are located where a bottom drain isn’t possible anyway, such as in
the bilge, keel envelope or wedged under a settee or bunk.I have my
tank, (horizontal cylinder) mounted against the hull in the port
quarter, under the cockit.

For my money, the regs be damned. I like my set up and because of
it I’ve never clogged a filter or run water through my injector…a
very expensive occurance.

Stan , hull #22, Waxwing


Do you Yahoo!?
The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo.

A drain sump just makes good sense. In aviation, a similar life critical
discipline
where high emphasis is placed on continued rotation of the prop, the very
first
thing a student learns to do in preflight is to drain the water out each
and every
time you start the bloody engine. In my mind, this is a case where safety
supercedes
the law. Look at the law and ask yourself whose butt is on the line.

Being a belt and suspenders man I would design the system aviation fashion
with one
sump for each tank and a final sump prior to engine access. It’s cheap
insurance.

----- Original Message -----
From: “jcskua” <jchurchill@erols.com >
To: <bcc@yahoogroups.com >
Sent: Wednesday, April 16, 2003 9:39 AM
Subject: [bcc] Re: fuel tanks

The USCG regs about tanks, etc only apply to inspected (eg passenger
for hire) vessels. They also forbid a number of other things common
on our strictly pleasure boats such as plastic bowls on the fuel
filters. We can do almost anything we want as those rules do not
apply to us. I think a drain bowl is a fine idea but not always
readily implementable.

John