Re: purchasing a bcc

Try looking here for a start:

http://members.aol.com/calypsonia/bcc/forsale.html

At 12:27 AM 4/4/00 +0000, you wrote:

I am looking to purchase a bcc and have found various layouts,
finsih, and even differnt style cabins. Are the factory boats best? I
am looking at a boat that is completely factory finish its a 1978
boat. What are prices like? Please give me any information you feel
pertinent. Also I have read alot about blisters, is this more common
in newer boats or older boats?


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Thinking about buying a BCC eh?!  You are checking out one terrific little ship.  All of Lyle's boats of this type are aimed at those sailors who are serious about sailing, living on the water and, perhaps most importantly, having the time and freedom to enjoy it all. BCC's are great sailors.  They do perfectly well in coastal waters-loads of fun and fine performance.  They amaze you offshore, with comfort and ability that is the envy of owners of much larger boats. 
    Some don'ts: Don't  try to do extended cruising with more than three people aboard.  Don't bother to enter into serious short-course racing with a BCC.  Don't miss out on living aboard at anchor, minimalist style, and sailing to a different anchorage every day.  Without starting the engine. 
    I'm biased-I built Minx #30 from a bare hull which sat in Seattle for 17 years untouched.  I have seen now 35 BCC's not including all the wood Hess boats.  No two have been alike.  I can only recommend that any potential buyer look at and sail as many boats as possible.  Each has it's own good points and shortcomings.  I think the Sam L Morse finished ones are the most consistently high in quality.  They also tend to sell for the highest prices.--R Myers
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, April 03, 2000 5:27 PM
Subject: [bcc] purchasing a bcc

I am looking to purchase a bcc and have found various layouts,
finsih, and even differnt style cabins. Are the factory boats best? I
am looking at a boat that is completely factory finish its a 1978
boat.  What are prices like?  Please give me any information you feel
pertinent. Also I have read alot about blisters, is this more common
in newer boats or older boats?



How long did it take for you to finish her, Roy? Start to finish. And how
close to the factory standard did you stay? Did you do the deck and
bulwarks?

I’m in my third year now on hull #109. Most of the time has been spent
repositioning financially (sitting idle), but I’m just about ready to turn
and burn. My garage is looking more and more like the shed at Sam L. Morse
as I accumulate bits and pieces of boat – just brought home a new yanmar
3GM last month and now have several parts which just need to be bolted and
caulked in place. After many months of looking abandoned, she will be making
a quantum leap forward all of a sudden. Projected launch date is December
2001.

Don K / Daytona Beach
----- Original Message -----
From: “Roy E Myers” <myersroy_e@hotmail.com >
To: <bcc@egroups.com >
Sent: Monday, April 03, 2000 10:33 PM
Subject: Re: [bcc] purchasing a bcc

Thinking about buying a BCC eh?! You are checking out one terrific little
ship. All of Lyle’s boats of this type are aimed at those sailors who are
serious about sailing, living on the water and, perhaps most importantly,
having the time and freedom to enjoy it all. BCC’s are great sailors. They
do perfectly well in coastal waters-loads of fun and fine performance. They
amaze you offshore, with comfort and ability that is the envy of owners of
much larger boats.
Some don’ts: Don’t try to do extended cruising with more than three
people aboard. Don’t bother to enter into serious short-course racing with
a BCC. Don’t miss out on living aboard at anchor, minimalist style, and
sailing to a different anchorage every day. Without starting the engine.
I’m biased-I built Minx #30 from a bare hull which sat in Seattle for 17
years untouched. I have seen now 35 BCC’s not including all the wood Hess
boats. No two have been alike. I can only recommend that any potential
buyer look at and sail as many boats as possible. Each has it’s own good
points and shortcomings. I think the Sam L Morse finished ones are the most
consistently high in quality. They also tend to sell for the highest
prices.–R Myers
----- Original Message -----
From: cfelder@capecod.net
To: bcc@egroups.com
Sent: Monday, April 03, 2000 5:27 PM
Subject: [bcc] purchasing a bcc

I am looking to purchase a bcc and have found various layouts,
finsih, and even differnt style cabins. Are the factory boats best? I
am looking at a boat that is completely factory finish its a 1978
boat. What are prices like? Please give me any information you feel
pertinent. Also I have read alot about blisters, is this more common
in newer boats or older boats?



From: <cfelder@capecod.net >
To: <bcc@egroups.com >
Sent: Tuesday, April 04, 2000 10:27 AM
Subject: [bcc] purchasing a bcc

Most of your questions are answered in the archive
http://www.egroups.com/list/bcc/
A beaut for sale is Leprechaun (74k US)
http://www.angelfire.com/bc2/bccutter/
(Archive 342, 386)
Good luck
Jeff Gilbert

Leprechaun is a beautiful boat but due to increased tankage, I do not
believe there is standing head room in the main cabin–otherwise a verynice
boat
Mark
-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff Gilbert <jgilbert@dynamite.com.au >
To: bcc@egroups.com <bcc@egroups.com >
Date: Tuesday, April 04, 2000 9:23 AM
Subject: Re: [bcc] purchasing a bcc

From: <cfelder@capecod.net >
To: <bcc@egroups.com >
Sent: Tuesday, April 04, 2000 10:27 AM
Subject: [bcc] purchasing a bcc

Most of your questions are answered in the archive
http://www.egroups.com/list/bcc/
A beaut for sale is Leprechaun (74k US)
http://www.angelfire.com/bc2/bccutter/
(Archive 342, 386)
Good luck
Jeff Gilbert


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Tristan- Originally I projected a build time of three six-month summers.  My work allows me long but frugal amounts of time off.  Indeed, it was only two extra months before she was launched. I hauled out again to do some final fitting out, so I put the total build time at 20 months over a period of five years.  I often worked a 12 hour day and loved every minute of the building process.  Minx was a blank when I got the hull and deck in 1994.  S.L.M  moulded the deck in 1977; the original buyer hadn't touched the project.  I moulded the ballast from lead wheel weights supplied with the hull.  Minx deviates slightly from the current stock plans. Forward, the workbench is long enough to use for a bunk.  The s't'bd locker is divided into three sections: two hanging lockers and one storage locker with three shelves.  The shower is very functional- in use daily at anchor.  With the mast bulkhead forward of the mast (I strongly recommend this important location), the salon is standard except: the peninsula that the galley sink is on extends some 6 inches in towards centerline, yielding room for a double sink and a real big double bunk.  To starboard, the settee is 2" shorter- 6'4", as is the quarter berth.  That little adjustment permitted the boat to have a usable-size chart table.  
    On deck Minx is pretty stock, though very complete.  A 9' glass dinghy rests in chocks on the cabin top, stern over the skylight.  Bulwarks, hatches, cockpit coamings, etc all look like factory but for small details.
    Congrats on the project you are involved in.  Enjoy it; once you are done, it is over.  Lets hear some more about how it's coming! -- R. Myers 
----- Original Message -----
From: Tristan
Sent: Monday, April 03, 2000 8:09 PM
Subject: Re: [bcc] purchasing a bcc

How long did it take for you to finish her, Roy? Start to finish. And how
close to the factory standard did you stay? Did you do the deck and
bulwarks?

I'm in my third year now on hull #109. Most of the time has been spent
repositioning financially (sitting idle), but I'm just about ready to turn
and burn. My garage is looking more and more like the shed at Sam L. Morse
as I accumulate bits and pieces of boat -- just brought home a new yanmar
3GM last month and now have several parts which just need to be bolted and
caulked in place. After many months of looking abandoned, she will be making
a quantum leap forward all of a sudden. Projected launch date is December
2001.

Don K / Daytona Beach
----- Original Message -----
From: "Roy E Myers"
To:
Sent: Monday, April 03, 2000 10:33 PM
Subject: Re: [bcc] purchasing a bcc



Thinking about buying a BCC eh?!  You are checking out one terrific little
ship.  All of Lyle's boats of this type are aimed at those sailors who are
serious about sailing, living on the water and, perhaps most importantly,
having the time and freedom to enjoy it all. BCC's are great sailors.  They
do perfectly well in coastal waters-loads of fun and fine performance.  They
amaze you offshore, with comfort and ability that is the envy of owners of
much larger boats.
    Some don'ts: Don't  try to do extended cruising with more than three
people aboard.  Don't bother to enter into serious short-course racing with
a BCC.  Don't miss out on living aboard at anchor, minimalist style, and
sailing to a different anchorage every day.  Without starting the engine.
    I'm biased-I built Minx #30 from a bare hull which sat in Seattle for 17
years untouched.  I have seen now 35 BCC's not including all the wood Hess
boats.  No two have been alike.  I can only recommend that any potential
buyer look at and sail as many boats as possible.  Each has it's own good
points and shortcomings.  I think the Sam L Morse finished ones are the most
consistently high in quality.  They also tend to sell for the highest
prices.--R Myers
  ----- Original Message -----
  From: cfelder@capecod.net
  To: bcc@egroups.com
  Sent: Monday, April 03, 2000 5:27 PM
  Subject: [bcc] purchasing a bcc


  I am looking to purchase a bcc and have found various layouts,
  finsih, and even differnt style cabins. Are the factory boats best? I
  am looking at a boat that is completely factory finish its a 1978
  boat.  What are prices like?  Please give me any information you feel
  pertinent. Also I have read alot about blisters, is this more common
  in newer boats or older boats?


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----- Original Message -----
From: “Roy E Myers” <myersroy_e@hotmail.com >
To: <bcc@egroups.com >
Sent: Tuesday, April 04, 2000 5:46 PM
Subject: Re: [bcc] purchasing a bcc

Tristan- Originally I projected a build time of three six-month summers. My
work allows me long but frugal amounts of time off. Indeed, it was only
two extra months before she was launched. I hauled out again to do some
final fitting out, so I put the total build time at 20 months over a period
of five years. I often worked a 12 hour day and loved every minute of the
building process. Minx was a blank when I got the hull and deck in 1994.
S.L.M moulded the deck in 1977; the original buyer hadn’t touched the
project. I moulded the ballast from lead wheel weights supplied with the
hull. Minx deviates slightly from the current stock plans. Forward, the
workbench is long enough to use for a bunk. The s’t’bd locker is divided
into three sections: two hanging lockers and one storage locker with three
shelves. The shower is very functional- in use daily at anchor. With the
mast bulkhead forward of the mast (I strongly recommend this important
location), the salon is standard except: the peninsula that the galley sink
is on extends some 6 inches in towards centerline, yielding room for a
double sink and a real big double bunk. To starboard, the settee is 2"
shorter- 6’4", as is the quarter berth. That little adjustment permitted
the boat to have a usable-size chart table.
On deck Minx is pretty stock, though very complete. A 9’ glass dinghy
rests in chocks on the cabin top, stern over the skylight. Bulwarks,
hatches, cockpit coamings, etc all look like factory but for small details.
Congrats on the project you are involved in. Enjoy it; once you are
done, it is over. Lets hear some more about how it’s coming! – R. Myers
----- Original Message -----
From: Tristan
To: bcc@egroups.com
Sent: Monday, April 03, 2000 8:09 PM
Subject: Re: [bcc] purchasing a bcc

How long did it take for you to finish her, Roy? Start to finish. And how
close to the factory standard did you stay? Did you do the deck and
bulwarks?

I’m in my third year now on hull #109. Most of the time has been spent
repositioning financially (sitting idle), but I’m just about ready to turn
and burn. My garage is looking more and more like the shed at Sam L. Morse
as I accumulate bits and pieces of boat – just brought home a new yanmar
3GM last month and now have several parts which just need to be bolted and
caulked in place. After many months of looking abandoned, she will be
making
a quantum leap forward all of a sudden. Projected launch date is December
2001.

Don K / Daytona Beach
----- Original Message -----
From: “Roy E Myers” <myersroy_e@hotmail.com >
To: <bcc@egroups.com >
Sent: Monday, April 03, 2000 10:33 PM
Subject: Re: [bcc] purchasing a bcc

Thinking about buying a BCC eh?! You are checking out one terrific little
ship. All of Lyle’s boats of this type are aimed at those sailors who are
serious about sailing, living on the water and, perhaps most importantly,
having the time and freedom to enjoy it all. BCC’s are great sailors.
They
do perfectly well in coastal waters-loads of fun and fine performance.
They
amaze you offshore, with comfort and ability that is the envy of owners of
much larger boats.
Some don’ts: Don’t try to do extended cruising with more than three
people aboard. Don’t bother to enter into serious short-course racing
with
a BCC. Don’t miss out on living aboard at anchor, minimalist style, and
sailing to a different anchorage every day. Without starting the engine.
I’m biased-I built Minx #30 from a bare hull which sat in Seattle for
17
years untouched. I have seen now 35 BCC’s not including all the wood Hess
boats. No two have been alike. I can only recommend that any potential
buyer look at and sail as many boats as possible. Each has it’s own good
points and shortcomings. I think the Sam L Morse finished ones are the
most
consistently high in quality. They also tend to sell for the highest
prices.–R Myers
----- Original Message -----
From: cfelder@capecod.net
To: bcc@egroups.com
Sent: Monday, April 03, 2000 5:27 PM
Subject: [bcc] purchasing a bcc

I am looking to purchase a bcc and have found various layouts,
finsih, and even differnt style cabins. Are the factory boats best? I
am looking at a boat that is completely factory finish its a 1978
boat. What are prices like? Please give me any information you feel
pertinent. Also I have read alot about blisters, is this more common
in newer boats or older boats?