VAT

VAT is similar to snipe hunting, you can chase it all night but no one every knows where it is because it is always changing.
 
Last year a cruising boat was allowed 6 VAT-free months to cruise the ECC, i.e. Euro-countries.  After 6 months, the boat would have to leave the ECC unless the owner paid VAT or placed the boat "in bond" for 6 months on the hard.  If the boat was placed "in bond," the owner/crew could not live on the boat but they could work on the boat.  After 6 months "in bond," the boat was free to cruise the ECC for another 6 months.  If the boat left the ECC at the end of the 6 month free-VAT period, the boat would have to stay out of the ECC for a 6 month period in order to have another 6 month free-VAT period.  If the boat entried the ECC before during this 6 month period it was accessed VAT.  The exception to these rules was/is France.  Although by agreement, France is bound to the rules of the ECC, what happened locally was another story.  Some boats reported being charged VAT by local authorities whether the boat was in its 6 month free-VAT period or had paid VAT.
 
This year, a boat is allowed to cruise the ECC for a period of 2 years.  The time starts at the first ECC port of call.  If you stop in the Azores, which is part of Portugal, an ECC member, the 2 year period starts at the  time of entry.  After the 2 year free-VAT period the boat must leave the ECC for a 6 month period, be placed "in bond" on the hard for 6 months or pay VAT.  After leaving the ECC or "in bond" for 6 months, the boat is allowed another 2 year free-vat period.    What the French are doing ...............  who knows.
 
If one decides to pay VAT, the VAT fee varies from country to country in the ECC.
 
Sail magazine recently had an article on cruising the ECC and VAT.
 
 
                                                                        VAT, VAT  the hidden trap,
                                                                         It makes the politicians fat.
 
                                                                         Now, Now what do you say to all this flap?
                                                                         Is it just a Euro wrap,
                                                                         Or just some high political mad cow trap?
 
I know, don't give up your day job.
 
Have a good day,
 
S/V IDUNA
 
 

and to complicate things, my understanding is that boats of '83 or
earlier are exempt from VAT due to age.
— In bcc@y…, “Rod Bruckdorfer” <seagypsy@a…> wrote:

VAT is similar to snipe hunting, you can chase it all night but no
one every knows where it is because it is always changing.

Last year a cruising boat was allowed 6 VAT-free months to cruise
the ECC, i.e. Euro-countries. After 6 months, the boat would have to
leave the ECC unless the owner paid VAT or placed the boat “in bond”
for 6 months on the hard. If the boat was placed “in bond,” the
owner/crew could not live on the boat but they could work on the boat.
After 6 months “in bond,” the boat was free to cruise the ECC for
another 6 months. If the boat left the ECC at the end of the 6 month
free-VAT period, the boat would have to stay out of the ECC for a 6
month period in order to have another 6 month free-VAT period. If the
boat entried the ECC before during this 6 month period it was accessed
VAT. The exception to these rules was/is France. Although by
agreement, France is bound to the rules of the ECC, what happened
locally was another story. Some boats reported being charged VAT by
local authorities whether the boat was in its 6 month free-VAT period
or had paid VAT.

This year, a boat is allowed to cruise the ECC for a period of 2
years. The time starts at the first ECC port of call. If you stop in
the Azores, which is part of Portugal, an ECC member, the 2 year
period starts at the time of entry. After the 2 year free-VAT period
the boat must leave the ECC for a 6 month period, be placed “in bond”
on the hard for 6 months or pay VAT. After leaving the ECC or “in
bond” for 6 months, the boat is allowed another 2 year free-vat
period. What the French are doing … who knows.

If one decides to pay VAT, the VAT fee varies from country to
country in the ECC.

Sail magazine recently had an article on cruising the ECC and VAT.

VAT, VAT the hidden trap,

It makes the politicians fat.

Now, Now what do you say to all this flap?

Is it just a Euro wrap,

Or just some high political mad cow trap?

I know, don’t give up your day job.

Have a good day,

S/V IDUNA

"ECC" should read EEC - European Economic Community
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2002 9:04 AM
Subject: [bcc] VAT

VAT is similar to snipe hunting, you can chase it all night but no one every knows where it is because it is always changing.
 
Last year a cruising boat was allowed 6 VAT-free months to cruise the ECC, i.e. Euro-countries.  After 6 months, the boat would have to leave the ECC unless the owner paid VAT or placed the boat "in bond" for 6 months on the hard.  If the boat was placed "in bond," the owner/crew could not live on the boat but they could work on the boat.  After 6 months "in bond," the boat was free to cruise the ECC for another 6 months.  If the boat left the ECC at the end of the 6 month free-VAT period, the boat would have to stay out of the ECC for a 6 month period in order to have another 6 month free-VAT period.  If the boat entried the ECC before during this 6 month period it was accessed VAT.  The exception to these rules was/is France.  Although by agreement, France is bound to the rules of the ECC, what happened locally was another story.  Some boats reported being charged VAT by local authorities whether the boat was in its 6 month free-VAT period or had paid VAT.
 
This year, a boat is allowed to cruise the ECC for a period of 2 years.  The time starts at the first ECC port of call.  If you stop in the Azores, which is part of Portugal, an ECC member, the 2 year period starts at the  time of entry.  After the 2 year free-VAT period the boat must leave the ECC for a 6 month period, be placed "in bond" on the hard for 6 months or pay VAT.  After leaving the ECC or "in bond" for 6 months, the boat is allowed another 2 year free-vat period.    What the French are doing ...............  who knows.
 
If one decides to pay VAT, the VAT fee varies from country to country in the ECC.
 
Sail magazine recently had an article on cruising the ECC and VAT.
 
 
                                                                        VAT, VAT  the hidden trap,
                                                                         It makes the politicians fat.
 
                                                                         Now, Now what do you say to all this flap?
                                                                         Is it just a Euro wrap,
                                                                         Or just some high political mad cow trap?
 
I know, don't give up your day job.
 
Have a good day,
 
S/V IDUNA
 
 



I wonder if the French know that??????????????????
----- Original Message -----
From: jcskua
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2002 10:06 AM
Subject: [bcc] Re: VAT

and to complicate things, my understanding is that boats of '83 or
earlier are exempt from VAT due to age.
John:
 
I assume the boat is in Norway because of VAT???????????  Can you give us a briefing about VAT,  cream and fat.
 
Would you like to become a cargo sail ship carrying small parts for a Sabb diesel engine - Two Years Before the Mast and all that rubbish.
 
Rod
S/V IDUNA
----- Original Message -----
From: jcskua
Sent: Thursday, January 09, 2003 1:02 PM
Subject: [bcc] Re: John, plans are slippery.

--- In bcc@yahoogroups.com , "bernyandray <bernyandray@h ...>"
<bernyandray@h ...> wrote:
> We're in Jacksonville right now and leaving in April or May for an
> indirect route south. We plan to be in Uruguay late this year and
> spend some time in colder climates, so we're really focused on the
> idea of heat :)  How about you? Where are you and are you heading
one
> way or another?   Ray

I am home for the winter, boat is in Bergen, Norway.  I am planning
on flying back in May, cruising the Norwegian Inside Passage, then
heading south via France/Spain/Portugal, then to the Canaries. 
TransAtlantic in December to either the Caribbean or perhaps the
Bahamas.  I am kind of giving Europe the bum's rush, but I have come
to the painful realization that my wife is never going to share my
excitement about long term cruising, so I am trying to expedite my
return and am looking for a real job starting after this adventure. 
Where we wind up taking a job will of course affect my final plans.
I think I may have some charts of South America if you are
interested.  They are older (early 80's maybe) DMA paper charts.  Let
me know if you are interested and I will try to dig them out.  I also
have charts of Greenland if you want to be cold in the Northern
Hemisphere.

John Churchill

John Churchill




Boat is in Norway because that was as far as it seemed reasonable to
go given the time of year. With an East Coast US departure at a
favorable time of year, one gets to Northern Europe late in the
season, July 9th to Ireland in my case with a May 20th departure from
Virginia. I had thought of cruising the Baltic a bit in the fall,
but did not have charts and was interested in getting home for other
reasons as well. Getting out of the EU was an added benefit. It
seems that one has 18 months continuous in the EU before VAT is
payable. There is quite a bit of confusion however and customs is
hard to get ahold of. On arrival in Ireland, there was not a customs
office in Baltimore, which has a sizable yacht harbor. We “cleared
in” with the local policeman who was not interested in our passports
or ship’s papers. The formalities were limited to his writing our
names down on his desktop page-a-day calendar. Entering the UK in
North Ireland, the harbormaster tried calling customs in Belfast and
got no answer. I tried calling a few times in Glasgow but could not
stimulate any interest. In contrast, when preparing to leave the UK
from the Shetland Islands, a customs officer came by of his own
accord and had me fill out a single sheet for departure. He said a
foreign flag yacht must clear into each country within the EU. On
arrival in Norway, again I could get no response from customs. It
was a weekend. I went to the international airport at Bergen, no
customs personnel present, called the phone # and got a recorded
message. Had the marina manager call them on Monday and I faxed info
to them. Got no response from that either. I am supposed to have 6
months in Norway but I understand that rule is rarely enforced. The
landscape makes it just about impossible to keep track of a boat
anyway. When I return to the EU I expect to have to check in and i
also expect that the beureaucracy will just get worse as I go south.
In Portugal, one clears in and out of each harbor.
I am willing to be a packet ship if desired. I do not know where to
get Saab parts, but imagine there is a dealer in Bergen. I did get
new Optimus burners for my stove. They were 185 NOK each, about
$50. About $75 in the USA, but hard to find. The real problem is
that prices are astronomical in Scandinavia. The markup here may not
be so bad considering how long you will have to wait for me to bring
parts home. What do you have in mind, a new 400 lb flywheel?
John