Engineless BCC

I am considering a BCC with no engine. Curious whether anyone has
knowledge or experience with an outboard mounted on a removable
bracket. Whether that was successful to any degree and was it a
viable alternative to the inboard diesel. Trying to reconcile the
cost/benefit of the inboard diesel. Any words of wisdom would be
greatly appreciated.

Cheers,

Steve

ready for a bunch of negativity? there are some great advantages of
no inboard-space and weight particularly. these are well outlined by
the Pardeys. i will give the other side of the coin-just a few things
to think thru for yourself. my old cape dory had a 15 honda in a
well. i find the diesel is much better and more convenient and i am
happy to put up with its maintenance in return for its reliable and
hard working service. while looking to buy my boat, i rejected one
without a diesel inboard, even though very attractively priced. most
looking for a bcc probably share my sentiment, making resale an
important issue. a removable bracket would be an engineering
challenge; most of the prefab ones are just retractable. the one the
Tillets put on Serrafyn is stainless. they had it bronze plated to fit
the traditional look. it is better, but still does not seem too
appealing to my eye.
mounting and unmounting the engine might become quite tiresome.
sooner or later you will drop it, bang up the woodwork, etc,
especially if you are underway. dangling over the taffrail (the
mainsheet and boomkin will be in your way) trying to lower the beast
into place while the boat is jumping all over and alternately rising
out of the water and trying to submerge the motor will certainly build
character. where are you thinking of storing it when it is not
installed? given the above, you will probably wind up leaving it on
the bracket most all the time, exposed to the weather. outboards are
not known for their reliability and this cannot help. where will you
store the fuel? jerry cans on deck are the only reasonable choice i
would think. do you make this a permanent arrangement? it is nice to
have fuel capacity for a long range. outboards are quite fuel
inefficient, especially the 2 strokes. thinking of a famous british
seagull? hear one run prior to buying it. i fell for the hype and
bought one; i almost went deaf from the noise. wife complained
bitterly.
outboards are easy to work on however. i just did a complete
teardown of my dinghy outboard to check on its internal condition
after overheating (impeller was only 21 years old). it is just a 2 hp
johnson, but i reassembled it including new piston rings in about 2
hours with tools that would all fit in my shirt pocket.new impeller,
rings and gasket set cost $33. nothing very high tech or close
tolerance engineered. i would be hesitant to do a major unbuttoning
of my yanmar, due to the value on the investment and the more
demanding mechanical skills and specialized tools.
i find myself becoming more inclined towards the style of Hal and
Margaret Roth. they had an inboard on Whisper but used it only when
necessary.
john churchill


John,

Thanks for the input. All points you raise are good indeed.

I have thought about the storage problem. A possible solution is to
utilize the lazerette. The bulkhead must be completely sealed to
isolate the main cabin, and ventilation could be provided by two
dorades…could be a bit of a grey area especially
considering the volitility of gasoline. Diesel outboards are another
angle. But the ones I have been able to find are too large and
too heavy.

I do feel that this question of the removable mount/bracket has an
acceptable solution. One that will not change the character of the
boat.

Thanks again,

Cheers,

Steve

  • In bcc@y…, jchurchill@e… wrote:

ready for a bunch of negativity? there are some great advantages
of
no inboard-space and weight particularly. these are well outlined
by
the Pardeys. i will give the other side of the coin-just a few
things
to think thru for yourself. my old cape dory had a 15 honda in a
well. i find the diesel is much better and more convenient and i
am
happy to put up with its maintenance in return for its reliable and
hard working service. while looking to buy my boat, i rejected one
without a diesel inboard, even though very attractively priced.
most
looking for a bcc probably share my sentiment, making resale an
important issue. a removable bracket would be an engineering
challenge; most of the prefab ones are just retractable. the one
the
Tillets put on Serrafyn is stainless. they had it bronze plated to
fit
the traditional look. it is better, but still does not seem too
appealing to my eye.
mounting and unmounting the engine might become quite tiresome.
sooner or later you will drop it, bang up the woodwork, etc,
especially if you are underway. dangling over the taffrail (the
mainsheet and boomkin will be in your way) trying to lower the
beast
into place while the boat is jumping all over and alternately
rising
out of the water and trying to submerge the motor will certainly
build
character. where are you thinking of storing it when it is not
installed? given the above, you will probably wind up leaving it
on
the bracket most all the time, exposed to the weather. outboards
are
not known for their reliability and this cannot help. where will
you
store the fuel? jerry cans on deck are the only reasonable choice
i
would think. do you make this a permanent arrangement? it is nice
to
have fuel capacity for a long range. outboards are quite fuel
inefficient, especially the 2 strokes. thinking of a famous
british
seagull? hear one run prior to buying it. i fell for the hype and
bought one; i almost went deaf from the noise. wife complained
bitterly.
outboards are easy to work on however. i just did a complete
teardown of my dinghy outboard to check on its internal condition
after overheating (impeller was only 21 years old). it is just a 2
hp
johnson, but i reassembled it including new piston rings in about 2
hours with tools that would all fit in my shirt pocket.new
impeller,
rings and gasket set cost $33. nothing very high tech or close
tolerance engineered. i would be hesitant to do a major
unbuttoning
of my yanmar, due to the value on the investment and the more
demanding mechanical skills and specialized tools.
i find myself becoming more inclined towards the style of Hal
and
Margaret Roth. they had an inboard on Whisper but used it only
when
necessary.
john churchill

John-

Hang on to that Johnson 2-horse. I’m still kicking myself for letting my dad
give away our Johnson 3-horse 15 years ago. That was a gem, high-tolerance
engineering and all.

However an outboard on a 28-foot cutter sounds like a nightmare in the making.
Useless in stormy weather.

However if you are really adventurous you can go with no motor at all, like in
that book ‘My Old Man and the Sea,’ where father and son circumnavigated South
America in a 24-foot sailboat without even an outboard. They rented an outboard
through the Panama Canal, and relied upon getting a tow in the few other ports
they visited. I can’t remember the author’s name but it was a fun read.

-Bill Amsden

ready for a bunch of negativity? there are some great advantages of
no inboard-space and weight particularly. these are well outlined by
the Pardeys. i will give the other side of the coin-just a few things
to think thru for yourself. my old cape dory had a 15 honda in a
well. i find the diesel is much better and more convenient and i am
happy to put up with its maintenance in return for its reliable and
hard working service. while looking to buy my boat, i rejected one
without a diesel inboard, even though very attractively priced. most
looking for a bcc probably share my sentiment, making resale an
important issue. a removable bracket would be an engineering
challenge; most of the prefab ones are just retractable. the one the
Tillets put on Serrafyn is stainless. they had it bronze plated to fit
the traditional look. it is better, but still does not seem too
appealing to my eye.
mounting and unmounting the engine might become quite tiresome.
sooner or later you will drop it, bang up the woodwork, etc,
especially if you are underway. dangling over the taffrail (the
mainsheet and boomkin will be in your way) trying to lower the beast
into place while the boat is jumping all over and alternately rising
out of the water and trying to submerge the motor will certainly build
character. where are you thinking of storing it when it is not
installed? given the above, you will probably wind up leaving it on
the bracket most all the time, exposed to the weather. outboards are
not known for their reliability and this cannot help. where will you
store the fuel? jerry cans on deck are the only reasonable choice i
would think. do you make this a permanent arrangement? it is nice to
have fuel capacity for a long range. outboards are quite fuel
inefficient, especially the 2 strokes. thinking of a famous british
seagull? hear one run prior to buying it. i fell for the hype and
bought one; i almost went deaf from the noise. wife complained
bitterly.
outboards are easy to work on however. i just did a complete
teardown of my dinghy outboard to check on its internal condition
after overheating (impeller was only 21 years old). it is just a 2 hp
johnson, but i reassembled it including new piston rings in about 2
hours with tools that would all fit in my shirt pocket.new impeller,
rings and gasket set cost $33. nothing very high tech or close
tolerance engineered. i would be hesitant to do a major unbuttoning
of my yanmar, due to the value on the investment and the more
demanding mechanical skills and specialized tools.
i find myself becoming more inclined towards the style of Hal and
Margaret Roth. they had an inboard on Whisper but used it only when
necessary.
john churchill

BRISTOL CHANNEL CUTTER OWNERS ASSOCIATION
Mail List Home: <a
href="http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bcc ">http://groups.yahoo.com/group/bcc
BCC Owners Home: <a
href="http://www.geocities.com/bccowners ">http://www.geocities.com/bccowners
Post message: mailto:bcc@yahoogroups.com
Subscribe: mailto:bcc-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
Unsubscribe: mailto:bcc-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
List owner: mailto:bcc-owner@yahoogroups.com

Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to <a
href="http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/ ">http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

— In bcc@y…, amsdenwm@g… wrote:

John-

Hang on to that Johnson 2-horse. I’m still kicking myself for
letting my dad
give away our Johnson 3-horse 15 years ago. That was a gem,
high-tolerance
engineering and all.

However an outboard on a 28-foot cutter sounds like a nightmare in
the making.
Useless in stormy weather.

However if you are really adventurous you can go with no motor at
all, like in
that book ‘My Old Man and the Sea,’ where father and son
circumnavigated South
America in a 24-foot sailboat without even an outboard. They rented
an outboard
through the Panama Canal, and relied upon getting a tow in the few
other ports
they visited. I can’t remember the author’s name but it was a fun
read.

-Bill Amsden

the author is daniel hayes, his dad is david. danny was my
freshman high school roommate. he was definately an out of the
ordinary guy. he sailed a dinghy across the stream to the bahamas. I
had the opportunity to see Sparrow when she was in a marina down in
morehead, nc last spring. spooner creek i think. she is really
small, about like serrafyn, maybe less interior volume due to narrow
beam.

getting a motor out of the lazarette would be a challenge. at
least on my boat, the tiller is really in the way if i need anything
big out. i wind up putting the tiller hard over to get it out of the
way so i can remove the lid. overboard drainage of the lazarette
would necessitate fitting a leakproof/airtight lid to the locker
underneath.
john churchill
john churchill

Concerning the chap who was interested in an engineless BCC: I just
completed a book called Antarctic Oasis by Tim Carr. He sailed his
engineless Falmouth quay punt to South Georgia Is. It is similar to a BCC
both 28’. He and his wife live there year round on Curlew. A great book on
difficult sailing in a small boat under unusual condions. Excellent
photography and info about the boat.